dry process

Side by Side

Preview text: 
Danny recently roasted a washed and a dry processed coffee from the same washing station in Ethiopia and wrote a a post for the Sweet Maria's blog.
Preview image: 

Danny recently roasted a washed and a dry processed coffee from the same washing station in Ethiopia and wrote a a post for the Sweet Maria's blog. After reading it, I was like, well shoot, I imagine that'd be pretty interesting to some shrub folks as well so here goes:

Dry Processed Coffee from KochoreDry Processed Coffee from Kochore

Images: 

Fundmentals: Roasting Dry Processed Coffees

Preview text: 
Roasting Dry Processed coffees has a lot to do with managing the First Crack. You can roast to really bring out the berry, or try to promote the dark cocoa notes, or you could roast for both!
Preview image: 

by Christopher Schooley, photos by Thompson Owen and Christopher Schooley

Coffee Cherry Drying on Patio at Fazenda Recreio in the Vale da Grama regionCoffee Cherry Drying on Patio at Fazenda Recreio in the Vale da Grama region

Roasting Dry Processed Coffees

Ethiopias

With 4 offering from Ethiopia currently on the list, I thought it would be fun to cup them all together and share them with a few others to see what they thought about them all together and on their own. With two coffees from Shakiso, one from Sidama, and one from Kochere (which is also Dry Processed), we have a fairly diverse selection to look at. It was a lot of fun to watch some folks cup these coffees from warm to cool, and to see the differences begin to show up in the cup. Obviously the first detectable difference was between the washed and dry processed coffees.

Naturally again/follow up

There was some excellent comments to the post I made a while back about my trip to Brazil in July. I loved the conversations that took about taking a closer look at processing. One of the questions that I asked was about harvesting and sorting, and what measurements and tools could be used in learning how to develop certain characteristics in the cup as well as control quality.

Images: 

Confused? Naturally

I just returned from the Roasters Guild Origin Trip to Brazil and there were a number of things that we saw that surprised me in both good and bad ways. We visited 9 different producers or producing groups where the main good surprises were the diversity of cup characteristics that we saw in the many cuppings in the many different growing areas. There was a clarity to many of the coffees that one doesn't traditionally associate with coffee from Brazil.